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One dead after single car accident on I-80

WQAD News -

BETTENDORF, Iowa- One person died at the hospital after a single-car accident on I-80.

Monday, August 12, around 12:30 p.m. police received several calls about an accident on I-80 at the Middle Road interchange, mile marker 301.

Police say a car was driving westbound when the driver failed to maintain control for unknown reasons and entered the median.  The vehicle then hit the median cable barrier, rolled over and came to rest against a guardrail near the eastbound lanes.

The single occupant was ejected from the vehicle during the wreck.

The driver was transported to Genesis East by Medic Ambulance where they succumbed to their injuries.

This incident remains under investigation by the Bettendorf Police Department.  The Bettendorf Fire Department, Iowa State Patrol, Iowa DOT, Iowa Commercial Motor Vehicle Enforcement, and Davenport Police Department assisted during the incident.

Angry wasps help German police nab fleeing fugitive

WQAD News -

BERLIN (AP) — A fugitive in Germany has been nabbed thanks to the help of angry wasps.

Oldenburg police said the unusual sting operation took place Monday after officers tried to arrest a 32-year-old man to serve an outstanding 11-month custodial sentence.

The suspect, whose name wasn’t released, fled from police and jumped from a balcony straight into a wasps’ nest.

The irate insects attacked the man, prompting him to run onto the street. Officers tried to apprehend him there, only to be attacked by wasps themselves.

The suspect managed to break free but with wasps in hot pursuit chose to jump into an inflatable pool, where he was arrested.

Speedway Fire Rescue Receives Funds from the Three Degree Guarantee

WQAD News -

Tom Pospisil and his grandson Xander Dierks from Eriksen Chevrolet were on-hand to present a check of $520 for the July Three Degree Guarantee to Speedway Fire Rescue

Accepting the check were Shawn Voisine, Gil Short, Kathy Gile, Karri Coyne, and Ed Bloomingfield representing Speedway Fire Rescue.

Formed in 1966 and based out of Davenport, Speedway Fire Rescue (SFR) provides training in tools and procedures, hands-on extinguisher training, mass-casualty scenarios, racecar safety equipment familiarization, air and ground transport procedures, and more. The organization currently works eight different dirt and asphalt racetracks every weekend from March through October, assists Cordova Dragway and Cedar Falls at specials, and works the Quad City Airshow.

f you would like to learn more about the Speedway Fire Rescue or on how to participate, please click here. 

If your charity or organization would like to be considered for the Three Degree Guarantee, please click here.

Person who provided Dayton shooter with body armor to face federal charges, source says

WQAD News -

People visit a memorial in the Oregon District, where a mass shooting early Sunday morning left nine dead and 27 wounded, on August 07, 2019 in Dayton, Ohio. The shooting happened less than 24 hours after a gunman in Texas opened fire at a shopping mall in El Paso killing 22 people. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — A friend of the Dayton gunman who killed nine people told federal agents he bought him body armor, a gun accessory and a 100-round magazine earlier this year, according to a court document unsealed Monday.

The charging document says Ethan Kollie bought the items for Connor Betts and kept them at his apartment so his friend’s parents would not find them.

Prosecutors on Monday unsealed a charge against Kollie that accused him of lying about not using marijuana on federal firearms forms in the purchase of a pistol that was not used in the shooting.

A message seeking comment was left at a phone number for Kollie.

The charge comes just over a week after the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, where 24-year-old Connor Betts opened fire in a popular entertainment district, killing his sister and eight others. Officers shot Betts within 30 seconds, killing him just steps outside a crowded bar.

Authorities have said hundreds more people may have died had Betts gotten inside.

Police have said there was nothing in his background that would have prevented him from buying the AR-15 style gun used in the shooting.

The weapon was bought online from a dealer in Texas and shipped to another firearms dealer in the Dayton area, police said on the day of the shooting.

Investigators have not released a motive for the shooting .

Eight of the victims who died were shot multiple times, according to the Montgomery County coroner’s office. More than 30 others were left injured, including at least 14 with gunshot wounds, hospital officials and investigators said.

Just days after the shooting, Ohio Republican Gov. Mike DeWine announced a package of gun control measures , including requiring background checks for nearly all gun sales in Ohio and allowing courts to restrict firearms access for people perceived as threats.

New Trump rules would further restrict legal immigration

WQAD News -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is moving forward with one of its most aggressive steps yet to restrict legal immigration, denying green cards to many migrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing vouchers or other forms of public assistance, officials said announced Monday.

Federal law already requires those seeking to become permanent residents and gain legal status to prove they will not be a burden to the U.S. — a “public charge,” in government-speak —but the new rules detail a broader range of programs that could disqualify them.

It’s part of a dramatic overhaul of the nation’s immigration system that the administration has been trying to put into place. While much of the attention has focused on President Donald Trump’s efforts to crack down on illegal immigration, the new change targets people who entered the United States legally and are seeking permanent status. It’s part of an effort to move the U.S. to a system that focuses on immigrants’ skills instead of emphasizing the reunification of families.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services will now weigh public assistance along with other factors such as education, household income, and health to determine whether to grant legal status.

The rules will take effect in mid-October. They don’t apply to U.S. citizens, even if the U.S. citizen is related to an immigrant who is subject to them.

The acting director of Citizenship and Immigration Services, Ken Cuccinelli, said the rule change fits with the Republican president’s message.

“We want to see people coming to this country who are self-sufficient,” Cuccinelli said. “That’s a core principle of the American dream. It’s deeply embedded in our history, and particularly our history related to legal immigration.”

Migrants make up a small percentage of those who get public benefits. In fact, many are ineligible for public benefits because of their immigration status.

Immigrant rights groups strongly criticized the changes, warning the rules will scare immigrants into not asking for help. And they are concerned the rules give too much authority to decide whether someone is likely to need public assistance at any time, giving officials the ability to deny legal status to more people.

The Los Angeles-based National Immigration Law Center immediately vowed to file a lawsuit. In a statement, the group called the new rules an attempt to redefine the legal immigration system “in order to disenfranchise communities of color and favor the wealthy.”

On average, 544,000 people apply annually for green cards, with about 382,000 falling into categories that would be subject to this review, according to the government.

Addressing the rule at the White House, Cuccinelli denied the administration was rejecting long-held American values.

Pressed on the Emma Lazarus poem emblazoned below the Statue of Liberty that reads: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,” he said: “I’m certainly not prepared to take anything down off the Statue of Liberty.”

Guidelines in use since 1999 refer to a public charge as someone primarily dependent on cash assistance, income maintenance or government support for long-term institutionalization.

Under the new rules, the Department of Homeland Security has redefined a public charge as someone who is “more likely than not” to receive public benefits for more than 12 months within a 36-month period. If someone has two benefits, that is counted as two months. And the definition has been broadened to include Medicaid, housing assistance and food assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

Following publication of the proposed rules last fall, Homeland Security received 266,000 public comments, more than triple the average number, and it made a series of amendments to the final rules as a result.

For example, women who are pregnant and on Medicaid or who need public assistance will not be subject to the new rules during the pregnancy and for 60 days after the birth.

The Medicare Part D low-income subsidy won’t be considered a public benefit. And public benefits received by children up until age 21 won’t be considered. Nor will emergency medical assistance, school lunch programs, foster care or adoption, student loans and mortgages, food pantries, homeless shelters or disaster relief.

Green card hopefuls will be required to submit three years of federal tax returns in addition to a history of employment. If immigrants have private health insurance, that will weigh heavily in their favor.

Active U.S. military members are exempt. So are refugees or asylum seekers, and the rules would not be applied retroactively, officials said. The administration also has moved to drastically reduce asylum in the U.S.

The administration recently tried to effectively end the protections at the U.S.-Mexico border before the effort was blocked by a court. It has sent more than 30,000 asylum seekers mostly from Central America back to Mexico wait out their immigration cases.

According to an Associated Press analysis of census data, low-income immigrants who are not citizens use Medicaid, food aid, cash assistance and Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, at a lower rate than comparable low-income native-born adults.

Non-citizen immigrants make up 6.5% of all those participating in Medicaid. They make up 8.8%t of those getting food assistance.

The new public assistance threshold, taken together with higher requirements for education, work skills and health, will make it more difficult for immigrants to qualify for green cards, advocates say.

“Without a single change in the law by Congress, the Trump public charge rules mean many more U.S. citizens are being and will be denied the opportunity to live together in the U.S. with their spouses, children and parents,” said Ur Jaddou, a former Citizenship and Immigration Services chief counsel who’s now director of the DHS Watch run by an immigrant advocacy group. “These are not just small changes. They are big changes with enormous consequences for U.S. citizens.”

The new rules come at a time of increased criticism over Trump’s hardline policies and his rhetoric.

On Aug. 3, 22 people were killed and dozens were injured in a shooting in El Paso, Texas, a border city that has become a face of the migration crisis. The shooting suspect told authorities he targeted Mexicans.

Critics contend Trump’s words have contributed to a combustible climate that has spawned death and violence, but Trump disagrees.

A woman took her three dogs to a pond to play. Within hours, her pups had died from toxic algae

WQAD News -

A doggy play date in a North Carolina pond turned tragic after three pups died from toxic algae. Now, their owners say they hope their loss will educate fellow dog lovers about the dangerous blooms.

Melissa Martin and Denise Mintz took their beloved dogs Abby, Izzy and Harpo to a pond in Wilmington on Thursday night to cool off. But within 15 minutes of leaving the pond, Abby, a West Highland white terrier, began to have a seizure.

Martin rushed her to a veterinary hospital, with Izzy and Harpo right behind her. Upon their arrival, Izzy, also a Westie, started seizing, and both terriers rapidly declined. Then Harpo, her 6-year-old “doodle” mix therapy dog, began to seize and show signs of liver failure.

By midnight Friday, all three dogs had died, she said.

The culprit, Martin’s veterinarian said, was poisoning from blue-green algae present in the pond where they played.

“What started out as a fun night for them has ended in the biggest loss of our lives,” Martin wrote in a Facebook post that has since been shared more than 15,000 times.

Martin told CNN she didn’t notice the algae at first, but her veterinarian told her that what appeared to be debris from flowers were blooms of cyanobacteria.

She said she didn’t see any signs warning of toxic algae near the pond, which sits next to a popular walking trail. It’s her mission now, she says, to erect signs about toxic waters and warn pet owners about the blooms.

“I will not stop until I make positive change,” she said. “I will not lose my dogs for nothing.”

Blue-green algae is most common in the summer

Toxic algae blooms are more likely to infest bodies of fresh water when the weather is warm and waters are stagnant, according to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.

Some algal blooms leave a film of muck on the surface and make the water ruddy, but others are difficult to immediately detect, such as the blooms in the pond where Martin’s dogs were exposed.

There’s no cure for the poisoning, and exposure nearly always leads to death in dogs. Drinking from a body of water where blue-green algae lurks or licking it off fur can kill a dog within 15 minutes of exposure, according to Blue Cross for Pets, a UK animal charity.

The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality periodically updates a map of the state where algae blooms have been reported, but in the case that a health notice isn’t posted, it’s best for humans and pets alike to avoid waters that smell bad or look odd in color or murky, the state’s health and human services department said.

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